Category Archives: Kids in Paris

Toy Box En Plein Air

One of the greatest things about the re-constructed Place de la République is this:R de Jeu Republique 1

A kid’s haven in the middle of the city, this alternative to a traditional park is like a communal, open air living room with a never ending toy box, holding everything from chalk to legos to tricycles, out and available for imaginations to run wild. The layout is totally open, making it feel inviting and free like a back yard, just full of other young friends to play with!

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The “R de Jeu,” as it is called, is open every day but Monday, all through the summer months.

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You can see all the layers of activity: human-sized (ok, little-human-sized) connect four, kitchenette, cup chairs…plus they boast 600 different games, which you can access in the red bodega at the center of the play zone (you can see it in some of the shots here).

And of course,  there are chairs and tables for parents to sit and relax!

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He even has his hard hat!

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Doing her thing….

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If you’re traveling with young kids or just want an amusing diversion on your way to the Canal Saint Martin, make sure you pass this way!

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Where: Place de la Republique

Metro: Republique

More information on the official website here

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Filed under Active & Outdoors, Kids in Paris

Paris Has a New Zoo

After closing its doors in 2008 because of deteriorating conditions for animals and visitors, Paris’ zoo in Bois de Vincennes has reopened with a new name, a new look and a new philosophy. Since it’s original construction in the 1930s, the zoo has now been completely rebuilt. The 65 meter high Grand Rocher remains the only familiar element of the landscape. Renamed the Parc Zoologique de Paris, the zoo has reestablished itself as a place for the education and research on biodiversity.

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With over 1000 animals, and 180 different species, the zoo is divided into five different bio-zones mimicking the natural landscapes of Patagonia, Sahel-Sudan, Europe, Madagascar, and the Amazon. Animals are grouped by natural habitat rather than by species, and many even cohabit within each zone.  Think much less concrete, and much more vegetation, many fewer walls, and much more open space.

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There is an interactive area for each of the five regions to educate visitors on the different parts of the world represented by the animals in the zoo. Visitors can learn about ecosystem hierarchies and environmental conditions, including those that are endangering certain species in each zone.

With 40% more green space than in the old zoo, there are upwards of 170,000 plants, and 870 plant species in the landscaping. Zoo officials worked hard to diminish the sense of captivity, using false rocks and lots of plant life to mask the barriers and functional elements of the park.

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The animals had been moved to zoos across Europe during the construction, except for a group of giraffes that remained on site. Bringing in almost all new animals post-construction, it took a year and a half to carefully adapt the animals to their new habitats in the zoo. Each animal has some element of the park designed just for them, whether it’s special trees for the birds and monkeys, or the lion, currently in his own separate habitat, with his heated rock to stretch out on for afternoon naps.

Parc Zoologique

April 12 was the official opening of the Parc Zoologique de Paris, after close to 170 million euros invested in its recreation. The zoo is open every day, and is accessible by metro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Culture and History, Kids in Paris